150: Chicken Soup and The Success Principles with Jack Canfield

On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Jack Canfield the author of the Success Principles and co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul Series.

Here’s what Travis and Jack discuss in this episode:

  • What’s Jack most excited about right now?
    • He’s spent the last fifty years training people to be more successful.
    • He’s now training trainers, 3,000 from over 100 countries and doing online training.
    • His life purpose statement is to inspire and empower people to live their highest vision in a context of love and joy.
  • Tell us about your journey?
    • He grew up in the hippie period of history.
    • He started changing his mind about success – the more money you have the more good you can do.
    • In college, he started to wake up in terms of liberation and fairness.
    • He applied to Harvard, Yale, and Brown.
      • He went to Harvard and majored in Chinese history.
    • Why Harvard?
      • What stood out was that there were 25 girl schools nearby.
      • It was near big cities, etc.
      • He took a course and encounter group where people talked about feelings and relationships.
        • He woke up in this class and realized that’s what he wanted to do.
      • He taught in an all-black inner city school and became more interested in motivating students.
    • What kind of relationship did you have with your first mentor?
      • He was taken under the wings of several mentors.
      • His mentors taught him not to waste his time on what we don’t agree on.
      • He was surrounded by gurus of positive belief.
    • What happened after you taught in the inner city?
      • He went back to Chicago and then to the University of Massachusetts.
      • He got arrogant that he didn’t need a Ph.D. and wrote a book.
      • He had a best-selling author professor and asked him how he did it.
      • He left school and started a growth center leading weekend workshops.
    • At what point did Chicken Soup for the Soul begin?
      • He learned that the only time the kids paid attention is when he told a story.
      • He started looking for stories of African Americans who’d “made it.”
      • He decided to write two stories every week and in a year he’d have a book.
      • His co-author came in and rounded out the book.
    • Talk about finding strategic partnerships.
      • Every entrepreneur has a genius.
      • Find people who love to do what you don’t love to do.
    • Talk about the name Chicken Soup for the Soul
      • They meditated for a week to come up with a title.
      • After pitching the name Chicken Soup for the Soul 144 times, they were rejected.
        • One publishing company agreed and it ended up selling millions of copies.
      • Talk about how to be persistent without being annoying.
        • If you’re coming from desperation people want to push you away.
        • If you start with passion and your “why” people get excited about it.
        • Jack talks about the 9 No’s Exercise.
      • Was there ever a time when you were open to workshopping the name?
        • He trusted the name and people who weren’t publishers loved the name.
      • Talk about entitlement vs. perseverance.
        • There’s a difference and a lot of people feel that they deserve a yes because they ask.
        • Negativity does not get you anywhere.
      • Talk about the marketing part of Chicken Soup for the Soul.
        • Chicken Soup for the Soul got to the top of the Best Seller List and stayed there for three years.
        • You’ve got to do at least one radio interview every day – three a day when you first start.
        • There are over 200 books in the series.
      • Talk about the difference between putting together Chicken Soup for the Soul and The Success Principles.
        • He wrote what he taught in the Success Principles.
        • Chicken soup was more aggregated content.
        • Both books utilize stories to inspire.
      • Which success principle means the most to you personally, of the ones in the book?
        • Take 100% responsibility. If you don’t get the outcomes you want, don’t blame the even, change your response.
        • Go within – meditation. Every great breakthrough came from a meditation.
        • You’ve got to act, respond to the feedback and persevere.
      • Talk about the difference between taking fault vs. responsibility.
        • It’s not about blame, it’s that if you don’t want it to keep happening, see what you might be doing.
        • The hard part is changing your behavior once you figure it out.
      • Touch on E+R=O
        • Everything you experience in your life is the direct effect of something else you did.
        • If I’m not getting what I want, what am I doing that’s producing that outcome.
        • You have control over your actions including what you say.
        • You have control over your visual images.
      • What do you think makes you a great networker?
        • It’s not natural, he was very shy as a kid.
        • He learned early on that who you know is as important as what you know.
        • He started attending conferences, workshops, and church.
        • When you go somewhere, act like a host.
      • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important, and why?
        • They’re both important, but you need expertise of some kind.
        • If nobody knows you’re good at something, it’s useless.
        • The third thing is focusing on your being – if you come off like a jerk you’ve disqualified yourself.
        • You’ve got to be present.
        • His morning routine is divided into three parts.
      • How do you balance being more confident with looking cocky or arrogant?
        • True confidence is not arrogant.
        • If you’re truly confident, arrogance just doesn’t happen.
        • If someone is over-pushing their message they’re not confident.
        • Confidence comes from surviving a risk.
        • You have to be okay with someone not liking you.
      • How does someone go about finding a mentor?
        • You have to find the people who are doing what you want to do or know what you want to know.
          • Always go a couple levels up, not five levels up.
        • If you’re really passionate about what you do then tell the person why.
        • Ask for ten minutes a month.
      • How many mentors is a good amount to have?
        • It depends on how many things you’re interested in.

The Random Round:

    • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
      • Tennis, movie director
    • If you could sit on a park bench with anyone for an hour who would it be, and why?
      • Jesus, Buddha, Mohammed
    • How do you like to consume content?
      • Experiential workshops going through a process
      • Second, books
    • What is a book you’d recommend?
      • The One Thing
    • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine?
      • 20 minutes of meditation
      • Blender Drink
      • Workout for 20-30 minutes
      • Shower
      • Read in the office for a half hour.
      • Plan the day the night before
    • What is something that you are not very good at?
      • Math, numbers, finances
    • What is your go-to pump up song?
      • Gonna Be Startin Somethin by Michael Jackson
    • What is one place where we can find you the most?
      • com
      • facebook/jackcanfield

Tweetable Quotes:

  • We know too much now for people to be suffering.
  • Find people who love to do what you don’t love to do.
  • How committed are you? There’s a yes out there.
  • Fear is self-created by imagining something in the future that hasn’t happened yet.
  • When you’re just yourself, the people who would be responsive to you are attracted in.

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.co – Podcast website

BYN.media/fb – Facebook Group

jackcanfield.com

Chicken Soup for the Soul

The Success Principles – book by Jack Canfield

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