The Podcast


Learn the best secrets on how to connect and build relationships with other professionals from guests like John Lee Dumas, Elena Cardone, Cole Hatter, JP Sears, Joel Brown, Ryan Stewman, Chris Guillebeau, Patrick Bet-David, Dr. Ivan Misner, and more!

Consider this the ultimate guide to growing your inner circle, increasing your influence, and sharpening your relationships.

069: Getting Good AF at Building Relationships with JP Sears

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews JP Sears, an emotional healing coach, YouTuber, author, international teacher, speaker at events, world traveler, and curious student of life.

Here’s what Travis and JP discuss in this episode:

  • About JP Sears:
    • Author of How to Be Ultra-Spiritual.
    • His hit Ultra-Spiritual Comedy series has accumulated over 100 million views.
    • Been making comedy videos for the last three years.
    • His style of comedy is using the language of comedy to help people get more in-touch with their authentic selves.
      • Ultimately to have more meaningful and fulfilling lives.
    • Was an emotional healing client coach for 13 years.
    • Ran workshops, classes, and retreats around the world.
    • While he was running workshops, he was living in betrayal of himself.
      • He wasn’t fulfilling the comedic part of himself.
      • He thought comedy would be bad for business.
    • When he brought comedy in and was true to himself, it was amazing for business.
    • “We always win when we bet on our true selves.”
    • Before comedy videos, he did serious self-help videos with the intention to funnel clients into the business.
      • Just got a few.
    • He thought comedy videos would repel clients, but it did the opposite.
  • What happened when he made the switch to comedy.
    • There were a few repercussions, but nothing too bad.
    • The BBC got a hold of one of his videos and wanted to interview him.
    • Anytime you say something meaningful, somebody will be offended.
  • Do you set aside creative time to come up with more videos, or is it just when you get inspired?
    • Both, he’s had to progressively had to restructure his day and his entire career.
    • All he was doing was working with clients, about a year ago he had to give up his client practice.
    • Many different opportunities have come his way.
    • His videos bring in great business, give personal satisfaction and impact others.
    • The first part of his workday when he’s home is creative time.
  • What aspect of your business (now that its grown) brings you the most fulfillment, or does what you do give you a steady fulfillment?
    • On the whole, the work he does is very fulfilling.
    • The most fulfilling thing is stage performances.
      • The dominant language is comedy, but there are some things being spoken from the heart.
      • He has to be very present to show up and give value.
    • How do you help someone who is not fulfilled with that they do and feel trapped.
      • Fulfillment isn’t related to the size of our audience.
      • Fulfillment is typically proportionate to the risks we take.
        • When we don’t take risks, we’re living complacency.
      • True happiness and fulfillment come when we’re growing.
      • Take a look at risks that you’re not taking and things that scare them.
        • Where is a risk that you’ve said no to, but part of you needs to say yes to.
      • Start doing new things, even randomly.
        • Every week do one new thing:
          • Do a class you’ve never done, etc.
        • This creates a pattern to interrupt and psychologically opens up consciousness.
      • Define what happiness is vs. gratification.
        • Happiness is a combination of meaning and fulfillment.
          • More big picture.
          • Might come by way of a lot of adversity and sacrifice.
          • When we’re in the pursuit of happiness, we often go toward gratification instead.
            • You need to re-orient yourself to what real happiness is.
          • Gratification is more about pleasure.
            • Might feel amazing now but destroy the rest of your life.
          • Happiness is a feeling and a deeper state of mind.
            • It’s somehow derived from within ourselves.
          • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important, and why?
            • The who has become incredibly apparent to him lately.
            • When taking on projects you’re not sure how to complete, it comes down to who you know.
            • He’s had the chance the past few years to grow his network to include really heavy hitters.
            • There is a lot of up leveling from being around people who are living in a more unlimited way.
            • Witnessing conversations, experiences from people who think this was and seeing how they don’t use limiting words is transformative.
          • Tell us about a time when a connection led to a big moment of success.
            • There’s an organization he did some speaking gigs for.
            • The point person became his friend.
              • Learned she used to work for Tony Robbins.
            • Thought he wanted Tony Robbins to endorse his book for him.
            • His friend made the introduction and Tony did the book endorsement and invited him to be a guest at one of his events.
            • The most meaningful factor when entering someone’s network is what they’ve done.
              • When he’s able to show what he’s accomplished, people welcome them into their network.
            • Not interested in what a person wants to do, he’s interested in what you’ve done.
              • Shows there’s some level of reciprocity.
            • What turns you off when people come up to you.
              • Biggest pet peeve, when people ask “how can I support you, JP?”
                • When he’s asked that question, the feeling is that there’s something incongruent going on.
                • It feels like they only want to do that so they can get supported back.
                • Some people will just tell him how they’re going to support them, and that doesn’t put a burden on him.
              • What’s your advice to people to establish a connection with someone at an event?
                • When people genuinely care and are interested, it looks unstrategic.
                • If you just sit in a conversation and care about the other person, they know that you’re being genuine.
                • This creates a visceral memory and fondness.
                • If you start to get real with people and break normal, you can express human care from your heart.
                • Being whole-sighted rather than short-sighted is incredibly powerful.
                • Don’t have a poverty mindset.

The Random Round:

  • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
    • Musician, with a guitar
  • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
    • Hitler, because he doesn’t know of another human being who’s expressed so much horrible.
  • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
    • Podcasts
  • One of your favorite podcasts.
    • The Tim Ferris Podcast
  • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
    • Take a mile walk
    • Meditate for 10 minutes
      • Eyes closed
      • Breath in and out
      • Mental mantra: “I’m breathing in, I’m breathing out.”
    • Do a quick gratitude journaling practice
    • Coffee and creative time
  • What is your go-to pump up song:
    • Radioactive by Imagine Dragons
  • What are you not very good at?
    • Little details in his personal life
  • Find him on Facebook and Youtube @awakenwithjp

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “We always win when we bet on our true selves.”
  • “Fulfillment is typically proportionate to the risks we take.”

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.co – Podcast website

BYN.media/fb – Facebook Group

CastBox App – Click Go Premium and enter promo code 90DAYS to get three free months of premium features.

AwakenwithJP.com – JP’s website

If Meat Eaters Acted Like Vegans video

Unleash the Power Within Event

The Tim Ferriss Podcast

Radioactive by Imagine Dragons

 

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068: Networking Secrets of the $100 MBA Show with Omar Zenhom

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Omar Zenhom, co-founder of The Hundred Dollar MBA, the largest alternative education business online. He’s also the co-founder of Webinar Ninja.

Here’s what Travis and Omar discuss in this episode:

  • About Omar Zenhom
    • He’s the co-founder of the $100 MBA podcast – daily ten minute video lessons.
      • Their goal is that you go away after every episode to take action and get better.
    • He runs the Webinar Ninja software – one of the biggest challenges of his life.
      • Has grown the user base from only 150 to over 2,000.
    • What made you switch into the world of online entrepreneurship?
      • In high school and college he wasn’t sure what he wanted to do as a career.
      • His father was in sales, a very up and down career.
      • He didn’t know if he wanted to get into business or sales.
      • He felt that he was good at teaching and graduated with a Master’s in Education.
      • Started teaching English as a second language.
      • Worked in Dubai for over a decade teaching English as a second language.
      • Taught at a high school and university level.
      • While he was teaching, he was dabbling in the internet.
        • Was trying to figure out if he could make money online.
        • Had an eBay store where he did arbitrage.
      • He started making money outside of his paycheck.
      • His uncle way always in business, and he started to listen to him.
        • His uncle gave him books to read.
          • He gave him the book Rich Dad, Poor Dad.
        • He started building small businesses online and discovering what kind of business person he wanted to be.
      • Why make the switch into making money online if your desire was teaching?
        • He was a great teacher and getting promoted every year, he was the youngest head of department at the university he was working at.
        • There’s a lot of red tape in education, not a lot of autonomy or freedom.
          • He got that feeling in business.
          • He liked to build something for himself instead of for an institution.
        • Teaching is like the military where everyone is working toward the same goal.
        • He felt like a cog in the wheel.
        • He didn’t see the freedom piece of the puzzle until he felt he could replace his income.
        • He read the Four-Hour Work Week and realized he’d never thought about that.
        • He got a High out of creating something and having someone buy it.
      • He created a podcast before the $100 MBA Show
        • He and his wife went to the New Media Conference in Vegas.
        • People told them to start a podcast.
        • They interviewed people on Skype and were told to turn that into a podcast.
          • This didn’t work or get them the traction they wanted.
        • After 46 episodes they needed to regroup.
        • They drove cross-country and had a long discussion about their podcast.
          • Realized they weren’t really using their strengths.
          • They decided they should be teaching on the podcast.
          • People asked them a lot of questions about how to live off of their business.
        • Why is it called the $100 MBA Show?
          • He thought he needed to get him MBA to be a great entrepreneur.
          • A professor told him he didn’t need his MBA to be an entrepreneur, you can learn all of that information outside of school.
          • He and his wife spent two solid months producing the podcast.
            • They had 30 episodes before they even launched.
            • They knew it was going to be a success.
            • Nobody knew who they were in podcasting and it was a very competitive year.
          • What was the line between giving up on your first podcast and being able to stop and move on?
            • You don’t want to give up too soon, but you don’t want to hold on too long.
            • You have to give anything at least six months and enough time every day to work on it.
              • You need to put in 10, 15, 20 hours per week at least.
            • You need to understand the trends.
              • If your listenership is decreasing week after week, that’s not going to work.
            • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important, and why?
              • Who you know, because if you have a solid network and know the right people, they’ll help you out.
              • One of the things that helped Omar was just seeing networking as trying to make friends.
              • He wanted to find people similar to him who were maybe a few steps ahead of them.
              • He just wanted to make friends because it’s nice to make friends.
              • He lost a lot of friends when he started working online because they didn’t have anything in common anymore.
              • People are more eager to help a friend out, than to help a stranger.
              • A lot of people separate their friendships from their business friendships, and it’s not about that.
              • At one conference he saw Chris Brogan and noticed how kind and interested he was with people.
                • He realized how smart Chris was, because he knew that the people he was meeting were the ones who made his brand.
              • Looking back over the last 4-5 years, is there a story you could tell about a time when a connection you made led to some sort of success down the road?
                • When he started the $100 MBA, one of the communities he was on helped him meet John Corcoran.
                • They became friends and talked, John has a huge network.
                • One time he got an email from John offering a 2-day public speaking workshop.
                  • He got a chance to know Michael Port, public speaker trainer.
                • He then started to learn how to be a public speaker and got to know Michael Port better.
                  • Omar felt that Michael was way ahead in business, but Michael doesn’t treat him that way.
                  • Now Michael is one of his closest friends and he’s a part of his mastermind.
                • You have to be open and say yes to certain opportunities when they present themselves.
              • Why do you think so many people don’t prioritize building relationships with people?
                • It’s not comfortable for some people.
                • Omar is a natural conversationalist, but some people don’t have that.
                • Some people will rationalize not wanting to build relationships.
                • With the ability to connect online, there’s no excuse not to connect.
                • Build a relationship online and them meet in person.
                • Networking encourages you to be a better communicator and gives you practice talking about your business.
              • Give us one tip on networking.
                • If you know one person, ask them if they want to go to a conference together.
                • If you go together, you get a chance to experience and meet people together.
                • You can introduce one another to people so you don’t have to talk about yourself.
                • You can run a forum or live event online together.
                • If you don’t feel comfortable talking about yourself, get really good at introducing others.
              • Throughout your career, how important have mentorships and masterminds been?
                • Even if a group didn’t sustain, it was still helpful. Sometimes you just grow out of a group.
                • The best groups are the ones that commit to help each other.
                • Five people max is really good because it gives you enough time to discuss everyone’s problems.
                • If you say that the purpose of the mastermind is to help each other achieve their goals, that sets a great tone.
                • You need to go and feel like everyone in the group has your back.
                • If you can’t be honest about your problems, you can’t get real help.
              • The Challenge: In 2018, join some kind of a mastermind.
                • You don’t have to wait for it, you can start one!

The Random Round:

  • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
    • Stand Up Comedy
  • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
    • Thomas Jefferson, a revolutionary thinker, ahead of his time.
  • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
    • Books
  • One of your favorite books.
    • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight
  • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
    • Wake up and see if the cat did something in the litter
    • Get ready
    • Make breakfast
    • Spend 30 minutes eating and watching basketball highlights
    • Clean up and get to work
    • Starts day with creative stuff (content, blogs, podcasts, etc.)
    • Take lunch and then focus on the other stuff
  • What is your go-to pump up song:
    • Dancing in the Dark by Bruce Springsteen
  • What are you not very good at?
    • Social life, his wife keeps them busy socially
  • Find him via email, use the contact form on 100 Dollar MBA or Webinar Ninja.

Tweetable Quotes:

  • With the ability to connect online, there’s no excuse not to connect.
  • A lot of people separate their friendships from their business friendships, and it’s not about that.

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com – Podcast website

The $100 MBA

The $100 MBA Show

Webinar Ninja

John Lee Dumas

Rich Dad, Poor Dad – Book by Robert T. Kiyosaki

Shoe Dog – Book by Phil Knight

Dancing in the Dark – Song by Bruce Springsteen

 

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067: Pro Wrestling and Podcast Movement with Dan Franks

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Dan Franks, the co-founder and co-organizer of Podcast Movement.

Here’s what Travis and Dan discuss in this episode:

  • About Dan Franks
    • Spent his 20’s as a pro-wrestler.
    • He now runs live events for a living, but never expected to do that.
    • His background is a CPA, doing taxes.
  • How long were you a professional wrestler and how did that come about?
    • He never grew out of his love of pro-wrestling, he knew he wanted to do that when he grew up.
    • In college he gave it a go and travelled for about 10 years wrestling professionally.
  • When he got to college, he trained to be a wrestler and did that on the weekends.
    • When he graduated he kept wrestling, but then started doing taxes.
    • He wrestled and did taxes at the same time.
    • When he showed up at tax meetings with black eyes and other pro-wrestling marks, he knew something had to go.
      • At this point he stopped wrestling.
    • From CPA to event organizer
      • He was listening to a lot of podcasts at work doing a lot of busy work.
      • One of his co-workers listened to a lot of the same podcasts.
      • Then he and his co-worker started a podcast about business and entrepreneurship.
      • This lead them to go to some conferences that included podcasters.
        • These were more generic conferences that included blogging and more.
      • He realized that there weren’t a lot of places that were just for podcasters.
      • A few people at those conferences got together to start their own podcasting event.
    • The first Podcast Movement Event
      • They figured out that putting on the event would be really expensive.
      • They started crowdfunding on Kickstarter when it was a new thing.
        • They called it the first dedicated national podcasting conference.
        • They shared the page with their friends.
        • They presold tickets to the event on Kickstarter.
        • This was the first step to put the event together.
      • What did finding speakers for Podcast Movement look like?
        • People were really excited about the event and interested in speaking.
        • It was a combination of reaching out to a lot of friends and people they had met at other conferences.
        • The bigger named people were a little more hesitant, because they had to guard their time a little more.
          • Now pretty much everyone who turned them down, has since speak at the event.
          • They’d asked John Lee Dumas for the first year, and he let them know that he didn’t have time, but he wished them good luck.
            • They decided not to take no for an answer, so they asked John if he would just come.
            • They finally got to the point where John agreed to moderate a panel at the event.
            • This turned into a relationship where John has taken part every year.
          • Some people say no the first time to everyone, and then start vetting people on the second attempt.
        • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important and why?
          • It has to be who you know.
            • A lot of what you know comes from who you know.
          • In what Dan has done, everything has started with a person.
          • He’s in the fake it ‘til you make it camp.
            • The easiest way to learn something is to dive into the deep end.
          • Tell us about a time in your life where a connection lead to a big moment of success.
            • A project he’s working on now came from a suggestion from someone very high up in the podcast space.
              • He felt there was a need that Dan and his partner would be a great fit for.
            • People they know are starting to bring us things that are based on those relationships they’ve built with them.
          • Why do you think that people neglect to network?
            • It’s hard, most people are introverted in nature.
            • There are a lot of online interactions and people don’t know how to cross over to a more personal type of relationship.
            • The digital divide keeps relationships from happening.
            • He loves live events because you can use them to bring people together and have real conversations.
          • How do you deal with the fear of rejection?
            • You have to ask yourself “what’s the worst that could happen?”
            • They still have people turn them down even when it really makes sense.
            • Every year Audio Technica turns them down for sponsorship, even though it makes a lot of sense.
            • The worst case scenario would happen anyway if you don’t ask.
          • If you had to narrow networking down to one tip, what would it be?
            • Make connections online first.
            • Find facebook groups and Twitter handles related to the events you’re going to go to.
            • If you’ve tweeted with someone before or commented on their blog posts, you can go up to them and bring up the time you had a conversation with someone.
          • What do you think about business cards?
            • Bring them, or have them, but don’t give it unless you’re asked for it.
            • The conference he runs has people from every age range.
              • Some people only know how to do networking with business cards.
            • He personally would want to have a business card to give, but wouldn’t necessarily want to throw them around on his own.
          • Of everyone you’ve met, who is the best networker that you know?
            • Dan says he’s not great at it naturally, but luckily his business partner Jared Easley is a master networker.
            • He’s great at connecting with people on Facebook and following up with them.

The Random Round:

  • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
    • Professional Wrestling again
  • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
    • Mark Cuban, he’s local to Dallas and they’re seeing everything he does from both a business and a personal perspective.
  • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
    • Podcasts/audio
  • One of your favorite podcasts.
    • Something to Wrestle – newer podcast hosted by Brother Love.
    • Raised by TV – newer podcast by two comedians about 90’s TV.
  • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
    • Wake up around 5am
    • Get ready and do crossfit
    • Come home, eat breakfast, get to work
  • What is your go-to pump up song:
    • Listens to podcasts, not music
  • What are you not very good at?
    • Networking, cooking
  • Find him on Twitter @DMFranks or his personal site DanFranks.me

Tweetable Quotes:

  • The easiest way to learn something is to dive into the deep end.
  • The worst case scenario would happen anyway if you don’t ask.

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com – Podcast website

DanFranks.me – Dan’s personal site

Podcast Movement – Podcasting Conference

Audio Technica – Audio Equipment Company

John Lee Dumas

Something to Wrestle With Podcast

Raised by TV Podcast

Planet Money Podcast

Startup Podcast

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066: I Just Connect People with Chris Winfield

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Chris Winfield, “The Super Connector.”

Here’s what Travis and Chris discuss in this episode:

  • About Chris Winfield:
    • He’s excited every single day.
    • He loves to be able to work and deal with so many amazing people.
    • He tries to connect people to their fullest potential whether that means media, an influencer or a great business person.
    • The biggest thing he sees that holds people back is a lack of awareness of how good they actually are.
  • How did you get into connecting people?
    • Always been the person in the middle of a lot of groups of people.
    • For most of his life he wasn’t fired up every day, he wasn’t happy or grateful.
    • He had co-founded an agency that looked great on the outside, but he hated what he was doing.
    • He was comfortable being uncomfortable. He didn’t want to make changes and so changes happened to him.
    • He didn’t know what he wanted to do, he knew what he didn’t want to do.
    • He made a commitment to himself to meet with one new person every day.
      • The only two rules for it were – be honest, up-front, and vulnerable with them and don’t go into it looking for anything. Just figure out what you can do to help this person.
      • The most important thing is to answer the question of what you can do to help somebody today.
      • You’re the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.
    • How did you become the editor for Thrive Global?
      • Through relationships and opportunities.
      • About four years ago he started writing in the personal involvement and productivity space.
        • His editor at Business Insider was Jacqui Kenyon.
        • They reached out about the new initiatives they were doing.
        • The woman behind that initiative was Callie Schweitzer.
          • She and Jacqui got hired by Ariana Huffington when she started Thrive Global.
          • They came to an influencer dinner he was running and they reconnected.
          • He ended up being asked to be Editor at Large for Thrive Global.
        • Is what you know or who you know more important?
          • Both are important.
          • The people are the most important part.
          • Anyone can be expert at something, but if he believed that what he knew was more important it would be a problem.
          • The level of your relationships is important, how deep of a relationship do you have with these people?
        • Tell us about a time where a connection in your life led to a big moment of success?
          • Every single day. He got off a call with someone who runs one of the largest conference series.
          • Somebody introduced him to this guy over a year ago. They stayed in touch and met again at a conference.
          • Now it will turn into something that will be an amazing opportunity.
          • That stuff happens every single day if he is looking and believing.
          • It can quickly go the other direction. If he’s thinking there’s no opportunity and he’s not good enough, that’s how things are going to be.
          • Where he’s at mentally, emotionally, and spiritually is guided by his mindset.
        • What are some ways to add value to someone without them thinking you want something from them in return?
          • One of the easiest ways to figure out how to add value is to ask them questions.
            • People like to talk about themselves.
          • There’s an idea that you have to be super prepared, but that’s not the way Chris looks at it.
            • He wants to understand what they’re all about
          • Being curious and actually caring about people makes a difference.
          • Enthusiasm is really underrated.
            • Showing up and being excited and actually caring.
          • What helped you get your enthusiasm back after your first job?
            • He has a daily practice and daily routines that he does every single day.
              • He does them in the morning to make sure he’s in the right state of mind.
              • He can easily forget how good his life is and how fortunate he is.
              • There’s not any circumstance that will just make you happy.
                • It’s more about the journey and practicing things on a daily basis than any particular area or circumstance.
              • One networking tip that you could narrow it down to.
                • Actually make connections with people.
                  • He meets with lots of different people to help them and he says you need to actually reach out to people and make contacts.
                  • You can’t get something if you don’t ask.
                  • Everything is so simple in life, that doesn’t mean it’s easy.
                  • If there’s somebody you want to get to know, figure out what makes them tick, how you can connect with them, get to where they’re going to be.
                  • The extra mile is never crowded.
                • What’s your advice to people who have a fear of rejection?
                  • Get over it.
                  • Think of it from a numbers perspective – every “no” is one step closer to a “yes.”
                  • What’s going to matter more, every no, or everyone who gets to do what you want to do.
                  • Don’t take yourself so seriously.
                  • You can’t get inside someone’s head, you don’t know what else they have going on.
                • His mind would love for him to focus on the rejection and someone ignoring him, rather than someone who’s loving what he does.
                  • His daily practice, meditation, and gratitude helps with this.
                  • Your ego is a big part of these feelings.
                  • You have to realize that everybody goes through rejection.
                  • If we start to think that our world is everything, there’s always something different.

The Random Round:

  • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
    • TV Talk show host.
  • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
    • Jesus, seems like the best person to know.
  • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
    • Books
  • One of your favorite books.
    • The Science of Getting Rich by
    • The Magic of Thinking Big by David Schwartz
    • The Power of Your Subconscious Mind
    • The Game of Life and How to Play It
    • Choose Yourself
    • Manifesting Miracles by Neville Goddard
  • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
    • Wake up between 4:30 and 5:30
    • Get out of bed and say today’s the best day ever
    • Make his bed and have a cup of coffee
    • Read a book.
    • Make two gratitude lists:
      • What I’m grateful for right now.
      • The things that are coming or happening now that he’s grateful for.
    • Meditate for 10-15 minutes
    • Write out a plan for the day
    • Text with some people and send gratitude list to best friend
    • Eat breakfast and do some work.
  • What is your go-to pump up song:
    • YouTube – Imagine Dragons Kendrick Lamar Grammy’s
  • What are you not very good at?
    • Math, organization, housework…most things.
  • Personal Facebook @ChrisWinfield

Tweetable Quotes:

  • Enthusiasm is really underrated.
  • The extra mile is never crowded.

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com – Podcast website

Chriswinfield.com – Chris’s Website

Tribe of Mentors – Book by Tim Ferriss

The Science of Getting Rich – Book by Wallace Wattles

The Magic of Thinking Big – Book by David Schwartz

The Power of Your Subconscious Mind – Book by Joseph Murphy

The Game of Life and How to Play It – Book by Florence Scovel Shinn

Choose Yourself – Book by James Altucher

Manifesting Miracles – Book by Neville Goddard

Imagine Dragons Kendrick Lamar Grammys

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065: Learn to Shake Things Up with Derek Halpern

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Derek Halpern, founder of Social Triggers – where entrepreneurs start and grow their business.

Here’s what Travis and Derek discuss in this episode:

  • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important and why?
    • When you know more, you can meet more people.
    • If you know everyone, but you have nothing to offer them, is that really a good connection?
    • You need a happy balance between having some skill and value and you need to meet the right people.
    • You need both.
    • Are you trying to meet people to just meet people, or are you trying to meet people who can become partners?
    • If you want to explode your network, you need some kind of value or skill to offer.
      • Pick one skill, become really great at it, and then when you network with people you have one thing you can offer.
      • Commas = comas, don’t have a massive list of things that you do.
    • If you’re willing to work for free for someone, they’ll introduce you to other people at their level.
    • Naturally, Derek is an introvert.
  • You need to go through learning implementation loops.
    • You should be reading a book a week.
    • He prefers to read biographies and memoirs – it lets you get motivated and know that you’re not alone.
    • You know that when something bad happens to you, someone else has it worse.
    • Read the first half of the John D. Rockefeller biography, Titan.
    • As I See It, by J. Paul Getty – another great read.
    • Reading books give you something to talk about.
  • If you bring a skill to the table, people know how to use you when the time is right.
  • Another way to bring value to the table is to just be fun to hang out with.
    • He’s made a lot of good friends by not leading with value and just having fun.
    • Building relationships will ultimately lead to creating value in people’s lives.
    • Dan Pink’s Drive talks about how when you pay your kids to do something, you cause them to lose interest later in life.
  • Derek didn’t read anything at all until he was 22 years old.
    • He ready Winning by Jack Welch where he learned that he read things to learn.
    • In Warren Buffets biography he says he read the biographies of the people who came before him and that’s what inspired him.
  • What shifted your mind into entrepreneurship?
    • He wrote a couple of full-length plays in college and then realized that you don’t make any money doing that.
    • He made money trying to write advertisements instead.
    • He also took his writing skills and turned them into writing a blog making fun of celebrities.
    • Had almost 100 million visits on his celebrity gossip blog.
      • His monetization was mainly just ad networks.
    • Nobody like writing – “I hate writing, but I love having written.” Quote by Hemingway.
    • He writes a lot of the main parts of his content himself.
    • He likes to tell a good story, entertain people.
    • The second most important part of networking is having something to talk about.
    • The number one problem people had was what they should talk about with people is how they should start.
  • If you don’t have anything to say, you’re better off asking questions, however there are two problems with this approach:
    • It’s like you’re interrogating them.
    • You’re not giving them anything to remember you by.
  • Derek believes every human on earth needs a personal story bank.
    • He keeps his in a note app on his phone.
    • He has hundreds of stories to tell.
    • Put one story in the story bank every day.
  • Storytelling Tip #1
    • Get to the conflict fast, get to the interesting part.
    • Start in the middle of the story to get to the interesting part.
    • He tries to publish at least one story every couple of days on his Facebook profile.
  • The Random Round
    • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
      • Stand-up comedian.
    • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
      • John D. Rockefeller, he grew up poor and built one of the largest companies in the world.
    • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
      • Books
    • One of your favorite books.
      • As I See It by J. Paul Getty
      • Scientific Advertising by Claude Hopkins
    • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
      • Wake up and hope he gets to shower
    • What is your go-to pump up song:
      • Not really that guy, if he needs an energy boost he goes outside and starts harassing people.
      • If he’s writing he listens to a song called Clarity by Zed
    • What are you not very good at?
      • Not very observant, bad at everything except business.
    • Go to socialtriggers.com and get on his email list.
    • He’s obsessed with Instagram

Tweetable Quotes:

  • If you bring a skill to the table, people know how to use you when the time is right.
  • If you know everyone, but you have nothing to offer them, is that really a good connection?

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com – Podcast website

Socialtriggers.com – Derek’s website

Derek’s Favorite Books:

As I See It by J. Paul Getty

Titan, John D. Rockefeller Biography

The Making of an American Capitalist, Warren Buffet

Drive by Dan Pink

Winning by Jack Welch

Principles by Ray Dalio

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064: Networking with Billionaires with Thor Conklin

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Thor Conklin, entrepreneur, profitability consultant, and host of Peak Performers podcast. He owns a Peak Performance consulting group.

Here’s what Travis and Thor discuss in this episode:

  • About Thor Conklin
    • He’s been an entrepreneur for the last 18 years.
    • He’s bought companies, sold companies, and even destroyed one company I his history.
    • People often think everything will get easier on their journey as they go, that’s not the case.
    • Before entrepreneurship:
      • He wasn’t a great student in school.
      • Applied to insurance school and didn’t get in.
        • Had to go back and take some classes at community college.
        • Then he came back to the insurance school.
        • He learned that most people don’t follow through.
      • He was a door to door life insurance salesman.
        • He had a briefcase, business cards, etc.
        • It was hard to find leads.
        • He got a degree in insurance and got into serving private equity firms.
        • Started Private Equity Risk Consultants.
      • In the commercial insurance space back then, there were no rates, everything was negotiated.
        • Based on your network you were more or less valuable as a client.
      • He was about 25 years old when he started working with venture capital firms.
        • His boss made him go to Hermes to get ties because he needed to fit the part.
      • The first company he started, a private equity firm came to him and asked him to work on all of their accounts.
        • This was one of the top five insurance companies in the world.
        • They gave him 10 minutes to come up with a name and a business plan.
        • In 20 minutes he had a deal done and was fully booked.
      • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important?
        • It’s who you know.
        • You have to know something, the K in PEAK performance stands for knowledge.
        • You have to execute on the knowledge.
        • You have to get around people who recognize the knowledge and can help you.
        • He was in proximity to people who were doing large deals, that helped him get the deals.
      • Tell us a story about a time when a connection led to a big success:
        • He was in Las Vegas at a business seminar.
        • He saw a couple buddies of his and he knew they needed to meet
          • He’s a connector.
        • About two months after his buddies connected, the one guy asked him to come to his office.
          • He gave him a 6-figure check in an envelope because the relationship was so profitable, and he wanted to thank him.
          • That introduction has led to even further involvement in their firm.
        • Boil it down to one tip on relationships.
          • What are you going in for? If you’re trying to figure out what you’re going to get, it’s a loser’s game.
        • Throughout your career, how important have mentorships and masterminds been?
          • He used to be a caddy on a golf course, he would caddy for a guy who was an incredible networker. He gave him a good start.
        • Why do so many people neglect to spend the time to network.
          • They don’t see the importance of it.
          • They’re not willing to get in and do the work.
          • They don’t have the right intention.
          • Networking properly takes time.
        • If you had a funnel standing up, everyone is trying to figure out how to get people into the funnel.
          • People are spending too much time up top throwing people into the funnel.
          • They don’t have someone, or are there themselves along the customer journey to nurture them.
            • These bottoms of the funnel people will throw referrals your way and those people don’t go into the top of the funnel.
            • You’ve got to be present.
          • People who network poorly usually do care, they just don’t understand how to connect. They’re every place except where they are.
        • What fears have you overcome networking?
          • He’s never really had fears, because it comes naturally to them.
          • He just says “Hi, I’m Thor, what’s your name?” and then he gets to know about them.
            • His intent is not to get, it’s to connect.
          • Does anybody think you’re joking when you say your name?
            • Yes, all the time.
          • Who’s the best relationship builder that you know personally and what makes them that way?
            • Charlie Weissman, his mentor on the golf course.
            • Jessie Itzler, the guy behind coconut water and married to Sarah Blakely, founder of Spanx.
              • He’s engaging and he makes you feel special and seen.
              • He’s generally interested in what you’re doing and he’s very curious.
              • Good networkers are curious, they’re not judgmental.
            • It’s your network that has the biggest effect of your net worth.
            • If he lost his contact list, he would go to Starbucks and just sit down with someone to get their information.
            • You need to have a genuine interest in what’s important to other people.
          • The Random Round
            • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
              • Yacht broker, they deal with the coolest clients
            • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
              • His dad, he’s passed away.
            • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
              • None of the above, doing.
            • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
              • Wake up at 4:59am, stays in bed and starts off with a commitment, says a prayer.
              • Gets up and has an audio program to his voice with music that’s meaningful to him.
              • Sits down and writes out his top three goals for the year.
            • What is your go-to pump up song:
              • Can’t Stop, Red Hot Chili Peppers
            • What are you not very good at?
              • Spelling
            • Find him on Facebook
            • If you have a business, or not, send a 50 word or less email to Thor@thorconklin.com telling him what the biggest issue in your life or your business, he’ll respond with a 4-step process that will annihilate that issue.

 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • People who network poorly usually do care, they just don’t understand how to connect. They’re every place except where they are.
  • Good networkers are curious, they’re not judgmental.
  • It’s your network that has the biggest effect of your net worth.

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.co – Podcast website

Peak Performer’s Podcast – Thor’s Podcast

Thorconklin.com – Thor’s Website

Can’t Stop Won’t Stop – Song by the Red Hot Chili Peppers

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063: Spending Multiple Six Figures on Masterminds with Dave Ruel

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Dave Ruel, the founder of Effic.

Here’s what Travis and Dave discuss in this episode:

  • About Dave Ruel:
    • He’s a Canadian from the east coast.
    • Been an entrepreneur online for about 10 years now.
    • His latest company is Effic, helping entrepreneurs get more efficient and effective.
  • Dave’s first business experience:
    • He’s not very academic, school wasn’t great for him.
    • He didn’t know what he really wanted.
    • Bodybuilding was his obsession in the early 2000’s.
    • His first business was cookbooks for bodybuilders
    • He coached people 1-1, he was making recipes to make bodybuilders diets less bland.
    • He built his first business out of necessity, but he did want the freedom part.
    • He met a fellow bodybuilder named Lee Hayward, he wrote a bodybuilding blog and made 6 figures a year.
      • He learned a lot from him about blogging, marketing, etc.
    • He then branched off into supplements, publishing and coaching.
  • What’s your favorite thing that you’ve done so far?
    • Out of everything, he loves creating the most.
    • Over years, they became really good at setting up systems for businesses.
    • Overall, he’s done pretty well with systemizing and they started Ethic out of demand.
    • He’s been running mastermind groups for about four years.
    • Really specializing in organization and systemization.
  • Masterminds are the secret weapon.
    • He joined Vince Delmonte’s mastermind.
      • He was the number one guy in the bodybuilding space.
      • He was able to meet so many people who became great friends.
      • Uses a lot of affiliate marketing to grow his businesses.
      • Out of demand, he had the opportunity to start his own mastermind.
    • He’s been doing one or two mastermind groups every year.
    • In group coaching, he holds entrepreneurs accountable to reaching their goals.
    • The big goal is to create the right environment for them to perform at their best.
      • Workflow, working with teams, hiring, etc.
    • He holds them accountable for an entire year.
    • Often you make friends for life and you have access to collective brainpower that you don’t have on your own.
  • How crucial have masterminds and mentorships been to Dave’s success?
    • Crucial – you must be a part of a mastermind that’s going to get you to the next level.
    • You need to be with your peers and who are going through the same thing as you.
    • Everyone should be a part of at least one mastermind at any given time.
  • Be a part of a mastermind that pushes you, but also get into a mastermind with all of your peers.
    • As online entrepreneurs, it’s important to have that aspect of community.
    • When you want to grow, pay to play.
    • When you pay in, you’ll find a way to create ROI.
  • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important, and why?
    • It’s both. It’s what you know and who you know in the right context.
    • You can know a lot, but it could be irrelevant to other people.
    • What you know needs to be in the right context of who you know, creating synergy.
    • He used affiliate marketing a lot to grow his business.
    • If he makes his affiliate win because they’re getting more business, he also makes himself win because he gets more eyeballs on his site.
      • You have a perfect triangle, because you have to have the right context, the right people and the right product.
    • What’s the most annoying thing a person can do when they’re trying to network or meet another person?
      • So many people are too strategic about it. They try to extract as much information from someone as if they’re never going to meet them again.
        • They ask you things like “What’s your top 5 tips for success?”
      • When you’re too strategic about relationships, you’re not going to be great at relationships.
      • When you’re not strategic and have no expectations, things turn out the way they should.
      • Don’t be weird about networking, just show up, be cool, be a part of the conversation and play the long game of building relationships.
        • It’s slow, it’s like dating.
      • Has building relationships come naturally to Dave?
        • Yes, he’s an extrovert and social.
        • The best deals have been done over drinks or cigars.
        • Every time he’s at a social event, you get into conversations that are not about business.
        • His deals weren’t made at the bar, but the inception was there.
          • You get to see who people really are and sense their agenda.
        • Advice for introverts:
          • The key is not to go wide, go deep.
          • You can be strategic with the amount of people you’re going to meet, not the interaction itself.
          • Be self-aware about your style. Instead of trying to talk to everybody, get deep with one or two people.
          • You don’t have to try to be someone that you’re not, just push yourself outside of you comfort zone.
          • Masterminds are great for introverts.
          • Masterminds are a safe environment where people won’t judge you for being introverts.
            • The caliber of people you’ll be with at a mastermind is usually pretty high.
          • If you had to narrow it down to one tip on networking, what would it be?
            • Pick the right mastermind for you and give it a go.
            • From there you will expand your network.
            • The high caliber people will introduce you to their network.
            • Don’t think about masterminds in terms of ROI.
              • 100% of the time, the value you get is completely different from what you expect out of a mastermind.
            • Since you’ve been in business, how much have you spent on masterminds, conferences, etc.?
              • Multiple six figures.
              • This has lead to the millions of dollars he’s made in his businesses.
              • He spends that much, but a lot of people that he’s met have contributed to public speaking events that he gets paid to do.
                • He also gets mastermind clients from these events.
              • What he spends he gets back because he gets paid to network.
            • The Random Round
              • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
                • Hockey player
              • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
                • Jesus, get to the bottom of what His vision was? There are so many variations of His message now.
              • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
                • He learns from every platform, but especially through osmosis. He’s a fan of just in time learning, he researches all the mediums as he needs them. He likes to be around people and observe.
              • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
                • Wake up around 6-7
                • Drink a big glass of water
                • Go and have 15 minutes of meditation on his land, uninterrupted.
                • Does his gratitude – he writes down what he wants to accomplish or where he’s heading
                • Cooks his daughter breakfast and hangs out with her
                • Goes to the gym
                • Post-workout shake
                • Starts day around 10am.
              • What is your go-to pump up song:
                • Mumford and Sons – Babel
              • What are you not very good at?
                • Copywriting
              • Can find him on Instagram and Facebook
            • The Effic planner – uses the production method.
              • You create buckets and break things down into smaller chunks.
              • There is a system to prioritize your tasks.
              • Quarterly planner.
              • Coupon code for Effic planner is TRAVIS to get 10% off.

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “When you want to grow, pay to play.”
  • “The key is not to go wide, go deep.”

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com – Podcast website

Buildyournetwork.co/fb – Travis’s Facebook group

Effic.co – Dave Ruel’s business website

 

 

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062: Making Millions in Real Estate and Making it Matter with Cole Hatter

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Cole Hatter, entrepreneur, investor, and award-winning speaker. Hatter is the founder of Thrive.

Here’s what Travis and Cole discuss in this episode:

  • About Cole Hatter
    • His main event is the three-day Thrive Conference.
    • He has a wife and two precious girls he strives to leave a legacy for.
    • Has made the majority of his money in real-estate and other investing.
    • He’s invested in businesses and some bitcoin.
    • He’s lost a lot of money and has made more than he’s lost.
    • Invests in people and real-estate.
  • How did you get into real estate investing?
    • He found it accidently
      • He was a firefighter and got in a bad accident that ended his career.
      • He learned how to walk again, he had to get out and practice.
      • His neighbors were in real-estate and had a lot of freedom.
    • Became a real estate agent
      • After three weeks, he became an investor to make profits instead of commissions.
      • He didn’t get bank loans, he worked with creative financing and got funded by wealthy people in exchange for 50% of the profits.
      • He found a gentleman at his church to help invest, as well as his dad.
      • Started developing their network with other lenders.
      • Started borrowing private money at a set interest rate.
      • Eventually he built relationships with lenders for interest where he kept all the profits.
      • Asset-based lending: looking at the deal and not the borrower. They were buying at 60% of the market value. When the deal has enough spread for profit, that’s the safety.
      • He spent all day every day scouring MLS, grinding it out.
      • Went to REIA groups.
      • The only reason people gave him money is because he spent months doing prep work and finding deals.
    • If you have $50,000 right now, but it’s not enough for your first investment, where should you put that money?
      • It depends on a person’s risk-tolerance and preference on liquidity.
      • The two questions a person should ask themselves are:
        • What’s your risk tolerance?
        • What’s your liquidity preference?
          • Real estate is one of the slowest assets to liquidate.
        • $50,000 is enough money to put down an EMD (earnest money deposit).
          • When you make an offer that gets accepted, you have to put down 3%, the $50k could be enough, then you need to find other financing.
        • Stocks have had a big upswing for a while, there could be a correction – watch out for them now.
        • Go get an education, understand stocks, bitcoin, real estate, etc.
          • S&P 500 betting has less risk – index funds do well.
        • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important than why?
          • Neither, it’s what you know with who you know that matters.
          • He knows someone who is worth hundreds of millions and has a reality TV show, but he also knows how to invest in real estate.
            • He’s not going to know how to profit from this person’s knowledge without knowing what he’s doing.
          • He can go down the list of friends and understand how the combo of what and who he knows makes him money.
          • The first seven years, it was just him and his dad grinding it out.
          • When you make money, your network changes.
        • How podcasting and Thrive has allowed him to build a fantastic inner-circle.
          • He shares content from Thrive in his current podcast.
          • His former podcast, where he interviewed people, and used that as an opportunity to pick experts brains.
            • This is a great way to move both ships forward.
            • He met John Lee Dumas through podcasting and then was introduced to a bunch of other friends.
            • He then created Thrive and that lit his network on fire.
              • The event gave him a lot of credibility and then each year it’s been better.
              • People are now reaching out to him to ask to speak at Thrive.
            • There was a timeline to the success, in 2012 no one knew him and now he has an insane network.
          • He and his wife are launching a new business and the contacts they need to make it happen are just a text message away.
          • Have patience, this takes years.
          • Offer a platform that creates value in people’s lives.
          • Say “not what can I get, but what can I give?”
        • Two tips:
          • Create win-win situations. People have to guard their time, so you have to provide them with something that’s valuable.
          • Be okay with hearing the word “no.”
            • No is a scary word for a lot of people. Put yourself in that scenario, if someone says “no” you’re in the same situation you were before.
            • If you get rejected, just get over it.
              • Persistence wears down resistance.
            • If you get a no, it’s like nothing’s changed almost always.
            • Don’t be afraid of no, you can’t personalize anything. You’ve got to take your wins with your losses.
            • If you get a no, a lot of times you’re talking to the wrong person.
              • Just talk to a new person, and sometimes that no will turn into a yes.
            • If you get a “no” you become less afraid to ask a new person.
          • How have 1-1 mentorships and masterminds allowed you to build your inner circle?
            • He has a mastermind and he pays to be a part of two others.
              • He personally spends $45k in the two masterminds he’s in 100% to make connections.
              • He’s picked up some things that have given him an ROI, but that’s not why he shows up.
              • He starts looking around for his next business partner, speaker for thrive, lender, etc.
              • He wants to create value in someone else’s life so they bring value to his.
              • The real point of a mastermind vs. reading a book or going to an event is to meet people and to network.
              • Say “not what can I get, but what can I give?”
            • The Random Round
              • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
                • Professional skydiver
              • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
                • His grandpa, he misses him and he died before he became an entrepreneur.
              • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
                • Coversations and picking people’s brains.
              • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
                • Hang out with family, eat breakfast with daughters and wife, check emails, gym, grind until 6pm.
              • What is your go-to pump up song:
                • Daiya New
              • What are you not very good at?
                • Paying attention
              • Can find her on her website: colehatter.com or thrive.com | @colehatter

Tweetable Quotes:

  • Say “not what can I get, but what can I give?”

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com– Podcast website

Buildyournetwork.co/fb – Travis’s Facebook group

Colehatter.com – Cole’s website

Attendthrive.com – Cole’s conference

REIA groups – Real Estate Investor’s Association groups

 

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061: Figuring Out This Entrepreneurship Thing with Dorie Clark

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Dorie Clark, adjunct professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, and the author of Entrepreneurial You.

Here’s what Travis and Dorie discuss in this episode:

  • About Dorie Clark:
    • She’s worn a lot of hats.
    • Her first book was called Reinventing You.
    • Started as a journalist.
    • 11 years ago, started doing marketing strategy consulting.
    • Focuses on helping get talented professionals seen and heard in a busy market.
    • She used to be a non-profit executive director.
      • She was running a tiny organization with three staffers.
      • She was under a ton of pressure to do fundraising.
      • She realized that if she didn’t raise funds the organization would go under.
    • She realized that she could run her own business and be less stressed while making more money.
    • She took a year to take classes and read books to learn how to launch her own business.
    • She then decided to become an entrepreneur.
    • She felt that it was less risky to be an entrepreneur.
    • If you want to jump into entrepreneurship, don’t feel like you have to do it without having a plan.
  • How Dorie “jumped in” to entrepreneurship.
    • Over time the vision of what you’re doing might change.
    • She originally thought she would be starting a political consulting business.
    • Based on where it was in the cycle, she didn’t get a lot of political clients up front, she got inquiries from non-profit and government agencies.
    • She quickly pivoted to being a marketing/PR consultant.
    • She recognized that the targets she was approaching were less receptive than she’d imagined, but other people were more receptive.
  • How long did it take to realize she needed to switch directions?
    • Within two or three months she learned that she had different clients than she thought.
    • Originally a lot of the work she was doing for people was a lot of pitching and PR stuff.
      • She did a lot of copywriting, speeches, etc.
    • Within 3-4 years of starting her business, she knew she’d need to move away from copywriting and PR.
      • Social media was on the rise.
      • Newspapers were collapsing.
      • She started to realize that doing PR was a losing battle and she had to pivot away from that.
    • What inspired Entrepreneurial You?
      • She wanted to understand what people were doing to be able to build 7-figure businesses as solo consultants.
      • She had a six-figure business but felt like she could benefit from learning some things.
      • Her go-to instinct was to interview people and then share those interviews.
      • She wanted to learn how to make more money and help other people make more money.
      • Interviewed over 50 entrepreneurs to create an action plan for people.
      • There’s gradations of becoming an expert at something.
        • She says to use “the peer that is just ahead of you” model.
          • You are often an expert to other people, even if you know just a tiny bit more than them.
        • Josh Kauffman wrote a book called The Personal MBA
          • He did not have an MBA, but he thought he could teach himself.
          • He read all of the foundational books in the business canon.
          • He wrote a book about what he learned.
        • A lot of people can lay claim to a form of expertise like Josh Kauffman.
          • A lot of people wait too long to position themselves as an expert.
        • Dori has a worksheet for people interested in thinking about ways to develop their own multiple income streams.
          • Ways to monetize what you’re doing.
          • It’s 88 questions to walk you through the process.
        • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important, and why?
          • It’s both, but if she had to pick it would be who you know.
          • We all know something, we just might not be the world’s expert at it.
          • If you can’t convey that you’re an expert, then you’re not helping anybody.
          • If you’re pretty good and have a good network, it’s a powerful combination.
          • If you’re pretty good and have a large network, you’ll become really good.
        • Tell us about a time where a connection led to a big moment of success.
          • As a side project, she will be entering a program called the BMI Musical Theatre Fellowship.
            • She will be training as a musical theatre lyricist.
            • She met Jeff Marx, the creator of Avenue Q.
            • She met him at the Ted conference, and he told her about musical theatre.
              • Jeff tipped her off to the BMI progam.
            • She applied and was denied, applied again and then got in.
          • She met Michael Roderick who is a networking expert who connected her with another colleague.
            • She was able to get into a program that will open up other professional pathways.
          • She does some stand-up comedy – got into that through a connection as well.
          • It’s easy for people to fall into ruts once they’ve mastered something.
        • Why do you think that a lot of people neglect to network?
          • Her connection invited a different colleague from a different department out to lunch every week.
            • At the end of the year you have 50 new contacts.
            • You could do this in your company or in your community.
            • People don’t do this because they fall into a pattern.
          • People think that networking just happens on accident, but it doesn’t.
            • That’s an irresponsible way to look at the activity of your life.
          • If you had to choose one networking tip to apply to people’s life, what would that be?
            • She interviewed Michael Katz for a Forbes article and he gave her this exercise:
              • If he had a list of 150-200 people who are the top people in his network.
                • Every day, he’ll take between 5-10 minutes and write 2-3 of these people a personal note.
                • By doing this you stay in touch, friendly and on the radar.
                • This way it’s not weird if you email them actually needing something, it’s not strange.
              • The Random Round
                • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
                  • A spy
                • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
                  • Greta Gerwig, Indie film actress and director
                • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
                  • Podcasts, there’s a large volume of them and you can listen when you’re doing other things.
                • What are some of your favorite podcasts?
                  • Revisionist History, Jordan Harbinger
                • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
                  • Wake up and go for a walk outside
                  • Go to a coffee shop
                  • Get an acai bowl
                  • Read the newspaper with breakfast and begin the workday
                • What is your go-to pump up song:
                  • Tegan and Sara’s music
                • What are you not very good at?
                  • Assembling things, spacial kinesthetic things
                • Can find her on her website: dorieclark.com

Tweetable Quotes:

  • If you’re pretty good at something and have a good network, it’s a powerful combination
  • Over time the vision of what you’re doing might change.

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com – Podcast website

dorieclark.com/entrepreneur – Dorie’s website

Entrepreneurial You – Dorie Clark’s book

Revisionist History – One of Dorie’s favorite podcasts

The Art of Charm – One of Dorie’s favorite podcasts

 

 

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060: Why Being Spammy Is NOT Annoying to Elena Cardone

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On this episode of Build Your Network, Host Travis Chappell interviews Elena Cardone, Actress, speaker, and Businesswoman.

Here’s what Travis and Elena discuss in this episode:

  • About Elena Cardone:
    • She moved to L.A. at 17, knowing no one but with hopes and dreams of becoming an actress.
    • Had ups and downs, success and nothing.
    • In 2003 met Grant Cardone, got married in 2004 and her life had a drastic change.
    • Forfeited acting to become an entrepreneur.
      • Pushed in all chips on Grant Cardone, it turned out to be a lucrative decision.
    • Was it difficult to give up acting for entrepreneurship?
      • It was a difficult decision because she had taken a big risk right after high school.
      • She always felt she had to have a cushion to protect herself until later in life.
      • When the 2008 collapse happened, she could see his vision of protecting their future.
      • The decision wasn’t hard when she decided she could trust him.
      • They had friends sue them for millions of dollars and that’s when she said “enough is enough.”
        • She wanted to create an empire that didn’t threaten destruction no matter what happens in the economy.
      • They’ve now had major wins, rewards, and achievements.
    • Story from her keynote:
      • She told Grant that he needed to go for a billion.
      • She said they’re friends with a few billionaires and she felt that Grant had more to offer than them.
      • She feels that he’s underutilizing his potential, but so is she.
      • She felt that he needed to be a billionaire because he’s exchanged that much in abundance with others.
      • Telling him to become a billionaire upset him on a number of levels because he’s doing so much work.
        • To hit a billion seemed overwhelming to him.
        • She let him know that he could achieve it.
      • The greatest love you can give to somebody is to help them achieve their goals.
      • When they hit their achievements, you forget about how hard it was to get there; it’s just all worth it.
      • A billion has been a great target for them because it’s expanded their capabilities and they’re on a completely different path.
    • You have to get rid of the mindset that money is bad; you need to get out of the greed mindset.
    • Why do you think that a lot of people won’t allow themselves to look at numbers like that?
      • She came from a background of scarcity, always worried about money.
      • People aren’t used to being able to have things.
      • The more money they’ve had, the less need she feels for things.
      • She doesn’t need things to make her who she is; she wants to help people.
      • Success facilitates your ability to help others.
    • Do you believe that what you know or who you know is more important and why?
      • It’s what you know, because if your mind is in the wrong place or you have the scarcity mindset, it doesn’t matter who you’re around because they won’t want to be around you and help you.
      • If you bring value, someone might help you.
      • Then, when you’re in front of the right people you’ve got to have something important to say
    • How did building relationships with other people help in the acting career?
      • She was always able to get the best modeling agencies.
      • As an actor, she was able to get the top agencies and managers.
      • Relationships are important because everyone talks and it’s a small world.
      • People want dependability, not drama or things that create problems.
      • If you’re not a superstar with mega talent, you weren’t getting an opportunity if ego was involved.
    • Tell us about a time when a connection you had led to a big moment of success.
      • She called a casting director after the audition, even though you’re not supposed to do that.
      • Got a role in the film which got her the Maxim magazine thing.
      • It helped her break into the movie aspect of things, just from the relationship with the casting director.
      • In life, if you’re her friend, she tries to help you.
    • How do you deal with people who have a hidden agenda?
      • She doesn’t mind them at all.
      • If someone comes to her to get to Grant, she thinks they’re a smart person.
        • Grant has a lot of gatekeepers, so that’s a smart move.
      • She doesn’t think wanting help from someone is a bad thing.
      • Sometimes the project’s not going to work out, so she has to say that.
      • If she met someone who could help her, she wouldn’t want to feel like she had to be friends talking about meaningless stuff.
      • Her friends in NOLA allow her to be herself before the success.
    • How does she recommend that someone approach her?
      • Something non-threatening. Showing up at house or condo is weird, she thinks in safety lines.
      • At a meet and greet, she’s ready and has her people. She’s ready to talk to you.
      • At a ball game or restaurant, she’s okay if you come up and talk to her.
    • Find her on Instagram
    • The Random Round
      • What profession other than your own do you think it would be fun to attempt?
        • Special forces in the military
      • If you could sit on a park bench for any hour with anyone past or present, who would it be?
        • Ron Hubbard, founder of Scientology
      • How do you like to learn best, books, blogs, podcasts or video?
        • Books
      • What’s one of your favorite books?
        • The Millionaire Booklet
      • Give us a glimpse of your morning routine:
        • Wake up around 6:00 a.m.
        • Get the kids ready and dressed and fed
        • Leave around 7:15 for school
        • On disciplined days, wake up at 5:00 a.m. put on a heavy workout vest and do 62-93 flights of stairs.
      • What is your go-to pump up song:
        • Purple Lamborghini
      • What are you not very good at?
        • Sales, she can’t go for the close
      • Can find her on Instagram and Facebook @elenacardone

Tweetable Quotes:

  • The greatest love you can give to somebody is to help them achieve their goals.
  • Success facilitates your ability to help others.

Resources Mentioned:

Buildyournetwork.com – Podcast website

www.grantcardone.com – Elena’s husband’s website

The Millionaire Booklet – Elena’s favorite book

 

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